2018 Vice

The Cranky Taxpayer

2018 Vice


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The 2018 data in the Police Department's Incident Based Reporting System as of July 17, 2019 report 2,091 unique vice offenses for the calendar year.  95.2% of those reports involved drugs or drug equipment:

Offense Count  
DRUG/NARCOTIC VIOLATION 1922 91.9%
DRUG EQUIPMENT VIOLATIONS 68 3.3%
PORNOGRAPHY/OBSCENE MATERIAL 74 3.5%
PROSTITUTION 23 1.1%
PROSTITUTION (ASSISTING/PROMOTING) 3 0.1%
GAMBLING/BETTING/WAGERING 1 0.0%
Total 2091  

The total is up a bit from 2017, particularly in the drug count.

Here are the Top Ten blocks for vice in 2018:

Block Count What's There
2200 Block CHAMBERLAYNE PKWY 28 Apartments
2900 Block CHAMBERLAYNE AVE 24 Apartments, Commercial
2600 Block CHAMBERLAYNE AVE 23 Commercial
3600 Block JEFFERSON DAVIS HWY 22 Commercial
6300 Block MIDLOTHIAN TPKE 18 Motel, Commercial
6600 Block MIDLOTHIAN TPKE 16 Motel, Commercial
1300 Block COALTER ST 15 Apartments
2100 Block KESWICK AVE 14 Convenience Store, Residential
3000 Block CHAMBERLAYNE AVE 13 Apartments
2000 Block CREIGHTON ROAD 12 RRHA

Fifty percent of those blocks sport apartments; if we count the motel blocks as "rental," we can say that 70% contain rental property.

The really Bad News is the ongoing problem at RRHA, which is by far the largest public nuisance in the City.

Overall, these data show the vice activity in Richmond to be concentrated at identifiable places, often associated with rental property.  State law declares this activity to be a nuisance and provides abundant criminal and civil authority to abate it. 

Indeed, nuisance abatement (generally directed at the property owner) is the sole strategy that can be shown scientifically to control drug dealing and related crime at private rental places.[1]

As these pages also discuss elsewhere, RRHA is maintaining the largest drug nuisance in the City.  It is long past time for a housecleaning at RRHA.


[1] A 1998 National Institute of Justice report to Congress, Preventing Crime: What Works, What Doesn’t, What’s Promising, discusses the place-bound nature of crime as follows: “Most places have no crimes and most crime is highly concentrated in and around a relatively small number of places. If we can prevent crime at these high crime places, then we might be able to reduce total crime.  [The] findings suggest that something about a few places facilitates crimes and something about most places prevents crimes.”  Of course, the something about most property that prevents crimes is an owner (and neighbors) who will not tolerate disorder.  In my view, the focus of community policing should be to encourage and assist the law-abiding landowners and to target the others.

 

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Last updated 07/18/19
Please send questions or comments to John Butcher